Call for Papers

Teaching With . . .

Certain books have had a profound impact on disciplines or sub-disciplines by re-orienting scholarship in meaningful ways – for example: Tomoko Masuzawa’s The Invention of World Religions, Russell McCutcheon’s Critics Not Caretakers, Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble; Gustavo Gutiérrez's A Theology of Liberation, Walter Brueggemann's The Prophetic Imagination, or Pierre Bourdieu’s The Logic of Practice, and others.

Such books can also have a substantial impact on teaching, even when they are not assigned as course reading.

This call seeks reflective essays of 1500 words that focus on how a groundbreaking book has re-shaped the way you teach.

Specific prompts to structure your essay:

  • How has this book changed the way you think about your discipline or sub-discipline? Be as short and succinct as possible in responding to this question so that you can focus on the next ones.
  • If you have used this book in a course or courses, how has it changed the way you design and teach those courses? Provide specific examples that connect the argument of the book to specific design issues, including the structure of the course, the construction of in-class activities, and the design of other activities such as papers and other assignments.
  • If you do not assign the book to students, how has it nevertheless changed the way that you think about and teach a particular course? Again, provide specific examples that connect the argument of the book to specific design issues, including the structure of the course, the construction of in-class activities, and the design of other activities such as papers and other assignments.
  • In your conclusion, reflect on the broader issues for teaching, course design, and even curriculum design that teaching with your particular book has raised.

For the purposes of this Call for Papers we are less concerned that the argument be grounded in scholarship on teaching or draw on and contribute to research on student learning. We seek essays that critically reflect on your own teaching practice through careful description and analysis of the processes of student learning you see in your various classrooms.

We encourage email inquiries that sketch an idea for a potential article; we will respond promptly to provide suggestions on how the idea could be developed into an article suitable to the journal.

Deadline for Submissions: July 1, 2019

_________________________________________________

Send manuscripts, inquires or questions, to:
Thomas Pearson
Editor, Wabash Center Journal on Teaching
pearsont@wabash.edu

Style Sheet
How to Submit

We encourage authors to take advantage of the open-access digital medium by linking to or embedding web-based tools, resources, graphics, and photos, as appropriate.